Uber drivers have mixed feelings about Prop 22

Rick Smith started driving for Uber and Lyft about three years ago. As a business consultant who works from his home in Palm Springs, driving for the companies offered a form of socialization while earning about $25 to $30 an hour on busy weekend nights catering tourists and locals around the California desert.

“I just wanted to do something to get out and talk to people, and something with flexibility,” he said. “The thing I loved about driving for Uber and Lyft is, if I’m not in the mood, I don’t have to do it.” 

Smith was among the 6.8 million California voters who voted yes on Proposition 22 —  about 58% of the vote —  following the most expensive proposition fight in state history. 

The passage means transportation and food delivery companies like Uber, Lyft and Doordash can classify employees as contractors insteadofworkers in the state of California, exempting them from a controversial state law that pitted workers’ advocates against the multi-billion dollar gig economy business.